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Event

BooksQUAD

Sunday 11 January 2015 to Monday 11 June 2018

BooksQUAD

Date & time: The second Monday of the month from 6pm
Venue: QUAD Participation Space
Price: Free, just turn up


Would you like to start reading more? Are you into books, discussing your thoughts and want to broaden your literary remit?

BooksQUAD brings together book worms with different preferences and perspectives, all with a shared love for the written word.
 
Come along any or every month as we take it in turns to select a book and discuss it. 
There is no fee to join, and you can come along as little or as often as you choose. You will however need to source the chosen book each month either from a library, book shop or online (you only need to choose one per month).

We meet in the Participation Space in QUAD (with discount on food and drink) on the second Monday of the month from 6.00pm until 8.00pm.

If you would like to be emailed and kept up to date with book choices each month, please email rhiannon.hulse@hotmail.com

Books for 14 May:

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
Also a film which won an Academy Award for Best Picture
In this classic of the 1960s, Ken Kesey's hero is Randle Patrick McMurphy, a boisterous, brawling, fun-loving rebel who swaggers into the world of a mental hospital and takes over. A lusty, life-affirming fighter, McMurphy rallies the other patients around him by challenging the dictatorship of Nurse Ratched. He promotes gambling in the ward, smuggles in wine and women, and openly defies the rules at every turn. But this defiance, which starts as a sport, soon develops into a grim struggle, an all-out war between two relentless opponents: Nurse Ratched, back by the full power of authority, and McMurphy, who has only his own indomitable will. What happens when Nurse Ratched uses her ultimate weapon against McMurphy provides the story's shocking climax.

A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes
Classic adventure novel and one of the most startling, highly praised stories in English literature.

After a terrible hurricane levels their Jamaican estate, the Bas-Thorntons decide to send their children back to the safety and comfort of England. On the way their ship is set upon by pirates, and the children are accidentally transferred to the pirate vessel. Jonsen, the well-meaning pirate captain, doesn't know how to dispose of his new cargo, while the children adjust with surprising ease to their new life. As this strange company drifts around the Caribbean, events turn more frightening and the pirates find themselves increasingly incriminated by the children's fates. The most shocking betrayal, however, will take place only after the return to civilization.

The swift, almost hallucinatory action of Hughes's novel, together with its provocative insight into the psychology of children, made it a best seller when it was first published in 1929 and has since established it as a classic of twentieth-century literature - an unequaled exploration of the nature, and limits, of innocence.


Books for 11 June 

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson
Won the Costa First Novel Award
This startling novel describes the adolescence of a ferociously bright and rebellious orphan adopted into a Pentecostal household in the dour, industrial Midlands and her coming to terms with her sexuality.

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood
Won the Canadian Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Also recently made into a Netflix series.

The story fictionalises the notorious 1843 murders of Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper Nancy Montgomery in Canada West. Two servants of the Kinnear household, Grace Marks and James McDermott, were convicted of the crime. McDermott was hanged and Marks was sentenced to life imprisonment.

Although the novel is based on factual events, Atwood constructs a narrative with a fictional doctor, Simon Jordan, who researches the case. Although ostensibly conducting research into criminal behaviour, he slowly becomes personally involved in the story of Grace Marks and seeks to reconcile his perception of the mild-mannered woman he sees with the murder of which she has been convicted.


Book for 9 July 

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
Won the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize for fiction

Set during the Great Depression, the novel focuses on the Joads, a poor family of tenant farmers driven from their Oklahoma home by drought, economic hardship, agricultural industry changes, and bank foreclosures forcing tenant farmers out of work. Due to their nearly hopeless situation, and in part because they are trapped in the Dust Bowl, the Joads set out for California. Along with thousands of other "Okies", they seek jobs, land, dignity, and a future.

All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews
Won the 2014 Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize, and was shortlisted for the 2014 Scotiabank Giller Prize, the 2015 Folio Prize for Literature, and the 2015 Wellcome Book Prize.
 
Elf and Yoli are two smart, loving sisters. Elf is a world-renowned pianist, glamorous, wealthy, happily married: she wants to die.
Yoli is divorced, broke, sleeping with the wrong men: she desperately wants to keep her older sister alive.

When Elf's latest suicide attempt leaves her hospitalised weeks before her highly anticipated world tour, Yoli is forced to confront the impossible question of whether it is better to let a loved one go.

Miriam Toews's All My Puny Sorrows, at once tender and unquiet, offers a profound reflection on the limits of love, and the sometimes unimaginable challenges we experience when childhood becomes a new country of adult commitments and responsibilities.

Book for 13 August (other book to be chosen in June)

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction, and was made into a film in 1985 directed by Steven Spielberg

With over a million copies sold in the UK alone, it is hailed as one of the all-time 'greats' of literature. In 2003 the book was listed on the BBC's The Big Read poll of the UK's "best-loved novels."

Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls 'father', she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie and is trapped into an ugly marriage. But then she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker - a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually, Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.

What a Carve Up! by Jonathan Coe
 
The novel concerns the political and social environment in Britain during the 1980s, and covers the period up to the beginning of aerial bombardment against Iraq in the first Gulf War in January 1991. It is a critique of British politics under the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher (and, briefly, John Major) and of the ways in which national policy was seen to be dictated by the concerns of narrow, but powerful, interest groups with influence in banking, the media, agriculture, healthcare, the arms trade and the arts. Coe creates the fictitious Winshaw family to embody these different interests under one name and, ultimately, one roof.
 
Good Reads says: "If Charles Dickens and Agatha Christie had ever managed to collaborate, they might have produced this shamelessly entertaining novel, which introduces readers to what may be the most powerful family in England--and is certainly the vilest. A tour de force of menace, malicious comedy, and torrential social bile, this book marks the American debut of an extraordinary writer."

To stay up to date with books more easily and to join in with social activities, please join the Facebook group:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/bookquad/

 


  • Monday, June 11, 201818:00