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Event

BooksQUAD

Sunday 11 January 2015 to Monday 10 September 2018

BooksQUAD

Date & time: The second Monday of the month from 6pm
Venue: QUAD Participation Space
Price: Free, just turn up


Would you like to start reading more? Are you into books, discussing your thoughts and want to broaden your literary remit?

BooksQUAD brings together book worms with different preferences and perspectives, all with a shared love for the written word.
 
Come along any or every month as we take it in turns to select a book and discuss it. 
There is no fee to join, and you can come along as little or as often as you choose. You will however need to source the chosen book each month either from a library, book shop or online (you only need to choose one per month).

We meet in the Participation Space in QUAD (with discount on food and drink) on the second Monday of the month from 6.00pm until 8.00pm.

If you would like to be emailed and kept up to date with book choices each month, please email rhiannon.hulse@hotmail.com


13th August - This session will NOT take place at QUAD - we will meet on Cathedral Green near the Silk Mill

Books for 13 August

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction, and was made into a film in 1985 directed by Steven Spielberg With over a million copies sold in the UK alone, it is hailed as one of the all-time 'greats' of literature. In 2003 the book was listed on the BBC's The Big Read poll of the UK's "best-loved novels." Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls 'father', she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie and is trapped into an ugly marriage. But then she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker - a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually, Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.

What a Carve Up! by Jonathan Coe

The novel concerns the political and social environment in Britain during the 1980s, and covers the period up to the beginning of aerial bombardment against Iraq in the first Gulf War in January 1991. It is a critique of British politics under the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher (and, briefly, John Major) and of the ways in which national policy was seen to be dictated by the concerns of narrow, but powerful, interest groups with influence in banking, the media, agriculture, healthcare, the arms trade and the arts. Coe creates the fictitious Winshaw family to embody these different interests under one name and, ultimately, one roof. Good Reads says: "If Charles Dickens and Agatha Christie had ever managed to collaborate, they might have produced this shamelessly entertaining novel, which introduces readers to what may be the most powerful family in England--and is certainly the vilest. A tour de force of menace, malicious comedy, and torrential social bile, this book marks the American debut of an extraordinary writer."

 

Books for 10 September - Back at QUAD

A Kestrel for a Knave by Barry Hines

Made into the 1969 film Kes directed by Ken Loach Life is tough and cheerless for Billy Casper, a troubled teenager growing up in the small Yorkshire mining town of Barnsley. Treated as a failure at school, and unhappy at home, Billy discovers a new passion in life when he finds Kes, a kestrel hawk. Billy identifies with her silent strength and she inspires in him the trust and love that nothing else can, discovering through her the passion missing from his life. Barry Hines's acclaimed novel continues to reach new generations of teenagers and adults with its powerful story of survival in a tough, joyless world.

The Good People by Hannah Kent

From the bestselling author of the multi-award-winning Burial Rites. Shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize 2017 County Kerry, Ireland, 1825. Nóra, bereft after the sudden death of her beloved husband, finds herself alone and caring for her young grandson Micheál. Micheál cannot speak and cannot walk and Nóra is desperate to know what is wrong with him. What happened to the healthy, happy grandson she met when her daughter was still alive? Mary arrives in the valley to help Nóra just as the whispers are spreading: the stories of unexplained misfortunes, of illnesses, and the rumours that Micheál is a changeling child who is bringing bad luck to the valley. Nance’s knowledge keeps her apart. To the new priest, she is a threat, but to the valley people she is a wanderer, a healer. Nance knows how to use the plants and berries of the woodland; she understands the magic in the old ways. And she might be able to help Micheál. As these three women are drawn together in the hope of restoring Micheál, their world of folklore and belief, of ritual and stories, tightens around them. It will lead them down a dangerous path, and force them to question everything they have ever known. Based on true events and set in a lost world bound by its own laws, The Good People is Hannah Kent’s startling novel about absolute belief and devoted love. Terrifying, thrilling and moving in equal measure.

 

Book for 8 October (other book to be chosen at the August meeting)

The Grass is Singing by Doris Lessing

Winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature 2007 The Grass Is Singing is the first novel, published in 1950, by British Nobel Prize-winning author Doris Lessing. It takes place in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), in southern Africa, during the 1940s and deals with the racial politics between whites and blacks in that country (which was then a British Colony). The novel created a sensation when it was first published and became an instant success in Europe and the United States. Set in Rhodesia, ‘The Grass is Singing’ tells the story of Dick Turner, a failed white farmer and his wife, Mary, a town girl who hates the bush and viciously abuses the black South Africans who work on their farm. But after many years, trapped by poverty, sapped by the heat of their tiny house, the lonely and frightened Mary turns to Moses, the black cook, for kindness and understanding. A masterpiece of realism, ‘The Grass is Singing’ is a superb evocation of Africa’s majestic beauty, an intense psychological portrait of lives in confusion and, most of all, a fearless exploration of the ideology of white supremacy .



To stay up to date with books more easily and to join in with social activities, please join the Facebook group:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/bookquad/

 

  • Monday, September 10, 201818:00